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Thread: reloading for BAR 30-06

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    Default reloading for BAR 30-06

    I received my father's '71 model Belgium Browning BAR in 30-06; I am working up a reload for it, and have a question;

    I am wanting to loading Hornady 150 gr. BTSP using my IMR4046 powder;
    I plan on starting at the bottom end with 47.5 gr. , and work up from there;

    My question is about the burn rate of the 4046 powder, in conjunction with my autoloader action; I can't use a real slow powder, due to over pressure in the gas resevoir, and don't want to beat up the gun either;

    4046 seems to be middle of the road of slow, and I see it for many medium cases, like my 270, and 338, which I use it for, and have had great success;

    So, I am looking for just fast enough, and not too slow

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    I have a buddy who has a BAR in 30-06. He used commercial ammo and told me the accuracy of the gun was not good. I gave him some of my reloads (full length sized) and he became a happy camper. The accuracy was less than MOA. I gave him some 165 grain Hornady SSTs with 57 grains of IMR 4350.
    Hunting and fishing are not matters of life or death. They are much more important than that.

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    everything I read is reloading 165 gr. in lieu of 150; must be for a reason; the gun is a banger; If you dont like recoil, you dont like the 30-06; But mine is a Belgium Browning BAR, which uses the gas for the action, and thus, the recoil is much less;
    I can shoot it all day, whereas I can't tollerate my muzzleloader (50cal), more than about 8-10 rnds; so go figure

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    If you have access to a Speer Reloading Manual, they list the recommended loads for gas oeprated rifles.

    Just an FYI...
    MarinePMI
    "Despite our ever-changing, ever-indignant world with its growing ignorance of and indifference to the ways of the wild, I remain a predator, pitying those who revel in artificiality and synthetic success while regarding me and my kind as relics of a time and place no longer valued or understood. I stalk a real world of dark wood and tall grass stirred by a restless wind blowing across sunlit water and beneath star-strewn sky. And on those occasions when I choose to kill,....I do so by choice, quickly, and with the learned efficiency of a skilled hunter." -- M. R. James

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    The Browning Automatic Rifle Mark II(the Mark II is a later model) has an adjustable gas port. I have a B.A.R. Mark II and it was short cycling(the bolt was not cycling all the way back and the fresh cartridge was hanging up in the mouth of the chamber)so I was told by Browning warranty center(in Missouri I think is where they are) to turn the adjustable gas port screw 1/2 turn counter clockwise to increase the gas bleed to the piston). I did that and the rifle worked flawlessly after that. Only the Mark II has an adjustable gas port. If your rifle is an older model and is not marked as a Mark II then it has a NON-ADJUSTABLE gas port. Hope this helps.
    'Nuff said
    larrysogla

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    The B.A.R. Mark II adjustable gas port screw has an interference fit thread on the screw.......so it will not loosen up and mess up the corrected adjustment even if you break the painted seal on the screw. My B.A.R. Mark II is a .338 Win. Magnum with B.O.S.S. integrated muzzle break. The recoil is a soft push even with Barnes X 225 grain loads. The adjustable gas port is a welcome advantage...............allowing the shooter to match the bolt cycling speed with the specific ammuni'shun. The British F.A.L. 308 military rifle also has an adjustable gas port. Great feature for the sportsman using varying ammo for coyote, deer, hogs, elk, moose, black bear, grizzly, buffalo etc. Most semi-auto high powered rifle bolt cycling speed is happiest with fast burning powders so that the gas port pulse pressure is not excessive. With very slow burning powders, the gas port pressure will be excessive because the slow burning powder will create a LONG PEAK PRESSURE PULSE. Excessive gas port pressure throws off the bolt timing with the chamber pressure still too high on bolt opening. This results in the just fired case still expanded and clinging to the chamber walls.............sometimes ending in stripped extractor rims or a ruptured case. A ruptured case will need a special tool(about $35) called a "ruptured case extractor" specific to the caliber. Hope this helps.
    'Nuff said
    larrysogla

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    Quote Originally Posted by mw0248 View Post
    I received my father's '71 model Belgium Browning BAR in 30-06; I am working up a reload for it, and have a question;

    I am wanting to loading Hornady 150 gr. BTSP using my IMR4046 powder;
    I plan on starting at the bottom end with 47.5 gr. , and work up from there;

    My question is about the burn rate of the 4046 powder, in conjunction with my autoloader action; I can't use a real slow powder, due to over pressure in the gas resevoir, and don't want to beat up the gun either;

    4046 seems to be middle of the road of slow, and I see it for many medium cases, like my 270, and 338, which I use it for, and have had great success;

    So, I am looking for just fast enough, and not too slow
    I purchased a 30-06 Belgium made Browning SemiAuto from Sears in San Bernardino in 1969 for $169 then purchased an RCBS reloading guide that recommended using a small base sizing die for the brass.I fired 150 & 165gr bullets using IMR 4895.I use data from 3/86 American Rifleman article Reloading For The M1 Rifle works great in my garand and 30-06 Sako L61 Finnbear.there is 150gr data using imr: 4064,3031,4895,4320 & win 748 If you want the article send me your email and I'll send it.

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