California Rabbit Jackrabbit Cottontail Hare Hunting Info

California Rabbit (Jackrabbit, Cottontail & Hare) Hunting Info

 

 

 

2013 - 2014 California Rabbit Hunting Regs

RABBIT SEASON:

General - July 1, 2013 through January 29, 2014 for cottontail, brush, pygmy and snowshoe rabbits. Black-tailed and White-tailed Jackrabbit season remains open year round.

Archery and Falconry - Jan 30 2014 - Mar 17 2014.

LICENSE REQUIREMENTS: Hunting License: You must possess a California hunting license in addition to the Upland Game Stamp. The cost of a hunting license is:

Annual resident hunting license - $44.85.
Junior annual resident hunting license - $11.62. (Required for any resident or nonresident less than 16 years of age who takes birds or mammals. To qualify, hunter must be less than 16 years of age at the beginning of the license year (July 1).
Non resident annual hunting license - $155.52. (Required for any nonresident 16 years of age or older who takes birds or mammals).
One-Day Nonresident license, age 16 and over (not valid for big game) - $21.34. IMPORTANT! This license is only available for nonresidents taking resident and migratory game birds on Licensed Game Bird Clubs (Upland Game Bird Stamp is also required) or Licensed Domesticated Migratory Game Bird Shooting Areas (Federal Migratory Bird Stamp and California Duck Stamp are also required).
Two-Day Nonresident license, age 16 and over (not valid for big game) - $44.85. Required for any person 16 years of age or older, for taking resident and migratory game birds, resident small game mammals, nongame mammals and furbearers for two consecutive days. IMPORTANT! This license is NOT valid for deer, bear, antelope, elk, bighorn sheep or pig.
Reduced Fee, Disabled Veteran - $7.05.
Duplicate Hunting License - $9.98.
Hunter Education Stamp - $3.75.
Harvest Information Program Stamp (HIP) - No fee. Required for any person hunting ducks, dove, gallinules, geese, band-tailed pigeon, black brant, coots, and snipe. This validation is free to hunters who complete the Harvest Information Program (HIP) Survey. The validation is available where hunting licenses are sold. The HIP Validation is imprinted on your hunting license document when you answer the HIP Survey questions. If you hunt migratory game birds, verify that a HIP Validation has been printed on your hunting license. The HIP Survey provides wildlife biologists with data needed to make wildlife management decisions and formulate hunting seasons. More information about HIP.

Upland Bird Stamp - $9.21. Required for any person taking upland game bird species, excluding juniors hunting under the authority of a junior hunting license.

The California hunting license is good from July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014. California resident and nonresident hunting licenses are nonrefundable and nontransferable.

Definition of Resident. A resident is defined as any person who has resided continuously in California for six months immediately before the date of application for a license, tag or permit; persons on active duty with the armed forces of the United States or an auxiliary branch; or Job Corps enrollees.

Disabled Veteran Hunting Licenses. A $6.74 hunting license is available for qualified disabled veterans. To be eligible, applicants must submit: (1) a letter from the Veterans Administration verifying that the applicant has a 70 percent or greater service-connected disability and was honorably discharged from the United States armed forces; and (2) evidence of meeting California hunter education requirements. Applicants renewing this license may submit their disabled veteran hunting license from the previous year as proof of meeting eligibility requirements. The reduced-fee provisions do not apply to hunting tags or species stamps. Disabled Veteran Hunting Licenses are issued only through DFG Offices.

Hunter Education Special Requirement. Hunting licenses shall be issued to hunters only upon presentation of one of the following:

An annual California hunting license from a prior year or evidence of having held such a license; a California hunter education completion or equivalency certificate; a certificate of competence or completion of a California approved hunter education training course from any state or Canadian province; or a current year hunting license from any state, province, European country or South Africa. For further information, contact any DFG office or license agent. A California hunter education validation stamp must be affixed to hunter education certificates from California.

Hunter Ed classes: Classes are given throughout the state. Classes are listed below by county. Check the list to find a class in your area.  If you cannot find a class, phone the Regional Hunter Education Coordinator and request information. Information on classes may also be obtained from sporting goods stores, license agents and sport shooting and hunting clubs.

http://www.dfg.ca.gov/huntered/classes.aspx

Home Study / On-Line Classes

On-line courses are available at Hunter-Ed.com , HunterExam California and International Hunter Education Association . The on-line course in itself will not get you a valid hunter education certificate. Once you have completed one of the above on-line courses, you will still need to attend a 4 hour follow-up home study/on-line class with a certified hunter education instructor. Access is permitted to the Home Study and On-line 4 hour follow-up class only after a student has completed the written Home Study or On-line component of the class. Contact the local District Coordinator for more information on the Home Study or On-line class.

Hunting Mentors And New Hunters Looking For A Mentor: We have forum where mentors and new hunters can hook up with each other. This is a great way to give back to the sport if you are a seasoned hunter. This is also an excellent resource for the new hunter to learn from a mentor who can help show them the ropes.

BAG AND POSSESSION LIMITS: The limit is five per day, and 10 in possession statewide. There is no limit for black-tailed and white-tailed jackrabbits.

SHOOTING HOURS: are from 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset.

BAITING: DFG reg. 257.5. You cannot use bait for hunting rabbits nor can rabbits be taken within 400 yards of any baited area. The definition of “baited area” shall mean any area where shelled, shucked or unshucked corn, wheat or other grains, salt, or other feed whatsoever capable of luring, attracting, or enticing such birds or mammals is directly or indirectly placed, exposed, deposited, distributed, or scattered, and such area shall remain a baited area for ten days following complete removal of all such corn, wheat or other grains, salt, or other feed.

SHOOTING FROM VEHICLES: DFG reg. 252. No person shall pursue, drive, herd, or take any bird or mammal from any type of motor-driven air or land vehicles, motorboat, airboat, sailboat, or snowmobile, except: 1) When the motor of such motorboat, airboat, or sailboat has been shut off and/or the sails furled and its progress therefrom has ceased, and it is drifting, beached, moored, resting at anchor, or is being propelled by paddle, oar or pole. (2)if they have a Mobility Disabled Persons Motor Vehicle License.

RADIO USE WHILE HUNTING: It is legal to use and posses two way radios while hunting in California.

DOGS: You can use dogs to locate and retrieve your rabbits.

TRESPASS: If the land you hunt on is not your own, it belongs to someone else. Make sure you have a legal right to be there. Contact the owner or person who administers the property, and secure written permission to hunt. A hunting license does not entitle you to enter private property.
“It is unlawful to enter any lands under cultivation or enclosed by a fence, belonging to, or occupied by, another, or to enter any uncultivated or unenclosed lands, including lands temporarily inundated by waters flowing outside the established banks of a river, stream, slough, or other waterway, where signs forbidding trespass are displayed at intervals not less than three to the mile along all exterior boundaries and at all roads and trails entering such lands, for the purpose of discharging any firearm or taking or destroying any mammal or bird, including any waterfowl, on such lands without having first obtained written permission from the owner of such lands, or his agent, or the person in lawful possession thereof. Such signs may be of any size and wording, other than the wording required for signs under Section 2017, which will fairly advise persons about to enter the land that the use to such land is so restricted.” Section 2016, Fish and Game Code.

SAFETY: It is always unlawful to: Place on, or carry or possess a loaded rifle or shotgun in a vehicle or conveyance or its attachments on any public road or other way open to the public: Hunt while intoxicated; Shoot at any game bird from a powerboat, sailboat, motor vehicle, or aircraft while under power or still moving from use of sail or motor. (See Section 251) Shoot any firearm from or upon a public road or highway.

DISCHARGING FIREARMS OR OTHER DEADLY WEAPONS SAFETY ZONE: It is unlawful for any person, other than the owner, person in possession of the premises, or a person having the express permission of the owner or person in possession of the premises, to hunt or to discharge while hunting, any firearm or other deadly weapon within 150 yards of any occupied dwelling house, residence, or other building or any barn or other outbuilding used in connection therewith. The 150-yard area is a “safety zone.”

CALIFORNIA DFG WEBPAGE is at http://www.dfg.ca.gov

Rabbit Biology 101

HISTORY - The jackrabbit is actually a true hare. The primary differences between a hare and a rabbit are the hare is generally larger with longer ears and has more powerful hind legs. It is a social animal and primarily nocturnal. Rabbits vary greatly in size, from less than a pound for a pygmy rabbit, to more than 10 pounds for a white-tailed jackrabbit. There are seven species of rabbit in California. In 2000, 12,489 California hunters reported the harvest of about 76,000 cottontails, and 11,360 California hunters harvested 75,000 jack rabbits.

MOUNTAIN COTTONTAIL RABBIT - Sylvilagus nuttallii

DESCRIPTION - The mountain cottontail was previously called Nuttall's cottontail. The mountain cottontail is of medium to large size for its genus with long hind legs and a large tail that is dark on top and light below. The top of the body is covered in grayish brown fur, and the underbelly is white. The hind legs are covered with reddish brown hairs that are long and dense. The ears are rather short and rounded. They have black tips and long hairs on their inner surfaces. The animal's whiskers are usually white. The females have eight to ten mammae. In this species there is a single annual molt. The rabbits weigh between 0.7 kg and 1.2 kg and are between 35 cm and 39 cm in body length. Females are nearly five percent larger than males.

Cottontails are intermediate hosts for many helminthes, and may contract tularemia and relapsing fever.

REPRODUCTION - Nests are found in dense vegetation, crevices, rockpiles, or burrows. The nest is a cup-like cavity lined with fur and dried grass. The top of the nest is covered with fur, grass, and small sticks. Breeding season is from April to July in northeastern California. Gestation lasts 28-30 days; an average of 6.1 (range 4-8) young per litter. Probably 2 litters per year in California. Young are weaned at about 1 mo. There are reports of females about 90 days old breeding, but this probably is rare.

DEFENSES - Cottontails are very tolerant of human activity. Cottontail predators are legion. Foxes coyotes, bobcats, weasels, domestic dogs and cats, hawks, eagles, and owls all commonly catch desert cottontails. Many species of snakes take the young. The only antipredation techniques reported are rapidly running to a safe sheltered area and restricting activity to dusk and dawn.

RANGE - The mountain cottontail (previously called Nuttall's cottontail) is found on the east slopes of the Sierra Nevada and the Cascades from Siskiyou and Modoc cos. south through the Great Basin to southern Inyo Co. (Orr 1940), and probably to San Bernardino Co. Primarily an animal of rocky, sage-covered hills and canyons, it is common in sagebrush, fairly common in sparse, montane riparian habitats, and uncommon in subalpine conifer, pinyon-juniper, juniper, and alpine dwarf-shrub habitats. Altitudinal range in California is from 1372 to 3200 m (4500 to 10,500 ft).

DIET - Prefers grasses, but lives most of the year on sagebrush, and will eat juniper berries. Mountain cottontail usually feeds in the shelter of brush, or in clearings a few meters from cover.

TRACKS -

SCAT - Mountain cottontail scat is round and usually in a pile. The round pellets are about 1/4" in diameter.

HABITAT - Optimal habitats are rocky, sage-covered hills, or canyons, with dense cover adjoining grassy clearings. Moves locally, in a very limited sense, following seasonal food supplies.

DESERT COTTONTAIL -Sylvilagus audubonii

DESCRIPTION - Also known as Audubon's Cottontail. Female desert cottontails are slightly larger than males, weighing an average of 988 g while the average male weight is 841 g. For females, total length is about 385 mm, length of hind foot is 90 mm, and ear length is 73 mm. Males' measurements are similar. Both sexes have the bushy white "cotton" tail.

Active yearlong; generally most active during the twilight periods, with some nocturnal activity. Not migratory.

Cottontails are intermediate hosts for many helminthes, and may contract tularemia and relapsing fever.

REPRODUCTION - Cottontails construct fur-lined nests on the ground or in burrows, usually within dense shrub stands. Desert cottontails generally breed from December through June, with a peak of activity from March through May. Gestation period lasts 26-30 days. Females produce 2-4 litters each year of 1-6 young, with an average of 3-4. The cottontail's estrous cycle may be influenced by availability of succulent green forage. Yearlong reproduction apparently occurs along the Colorado River and in some other areas adjacent to irrigated alfalfa and other succulent green crops.

DEFENSES - Desert cottontails are very tolerant of human activity. Cottontail predators are legion. Foxes coyotes, bobcats, weasels, domestic dogs and cats, hawks, eagles, and owls all commonly catch desert cottontails. Many species of snakes take the young. The only antipredation techniques reported are rapidly running to a safe sheltered area and restricting activity to dusk and dawn. When one is startled it may freeze or it may run for cover. They run in a zig-zag pattern, at about 15 miles per hour. This species has more athletic ability than the others in its genus, having the ability to swim and to climb trees and brush piles.

cottontail track diagramTRACKS -

SCAT - Desert cottontail scat is round and usually in a pile. The round pellets are about 1/4" in diameter.

RANGE - This cottontail is found in deserts from western North Dakota to southern Baja California & central Mexico. Inhabits most of the southern two-thirds of the state, excluding the higher elevations. Range extends north into the Sacramento Valley and surrounding foothills. Click for range map

DIET - Desert cottontails are herbivorous. They feed in most canopy-closure classes, but they prefer grasslands. They graze and browse on a wide variety of grasses, forbs, tree and shrub leaves, twigs, fallen fruit, acorns, and tender bark. Cottontails may compete for food with sympatric herbivores such as domestic livestock, deer, ground squirrels, hares, and various invertebrates.

HABITAT - Good habitats for cottontails contain small, scattered patches of dense shrub cover with abundant shrub/herbaceous edge for foraging. Abundant to common in grasslands, open forests, and desert shrub habitats. Found in more open habitats than brush rabbits.

 

BRUSH RABBIT - Sylvilagus bachmani

DESCRIPTION - Mass: 475 to 917 grams. Brush rabbits are a small to medium sized cottontail. The pelage is evenly dark, consisting of steel gray, black, and orange. The ears are fairly small with a slight point. The tail is not prominent, on the top it is the same dark brown and white underneath. Ranges in length from 11 inches to 14 1/2 inches. Females are generally a little bigger than males.

Usually most active during twilight periods; less active at night, and occasionally active in daytime, often on cloudy, or overcast days. Active throughout the year.

REPRODUCTION - Breeding occurs from January through August, with most activity from March through June. Females produce 2-4 litters per year, of 1-6 young (average 3-4). Gestation period is 27-30 days, and lactation generally is completed by August. Young brush rabbits remain in the nest approximately 2 weeks. Brush rabbits nest in cavities, dug or natural, approximately 7.5 to 15 cm (3 to 6 in) deep, in the ground, usually beneath brushy cover. The nest is lined with dry vegetation, and/or fur, and often it is plugged with dry vegetation.

DEFENSES - Predators of brush rabbits include bobcats coyotes, gray foxes, domestic dogs and cats, long-tailed weasels, minks, spotted skunks, striped skunks, red tailed hawks, Cooper's hawks, barn owls, rattlesnakes and gopher snakes.

RANGE - As its name implies, it inhabits areas with dense brush from western Oregon to southern Baja California. Click for range map

DIET - Brush rabbits are herbivorous. They graze on a wide variety of grasses and forbs (e.g., clovers, foxtails, bromes, thistles) in grasslands, meadows, and riparian areas, always within, or very close to, dense brushy cover. Brush rabbits also browse, especially in fall and winter, on tender leaves, twigs, buds, and bark of blackberry, wild rose, and other species.

HABITAT - Abundant, yearlong resident of dense, brushy areas, and of early successional stages of oak and conifer habitats. Dense brush cover of thickets, vines, brambles, or dense riparian species form the center of the brush rabbit life. Blackberry and willow patches are favored coverts. Inhabits the length of the state west of the Sierra Nevada, excluding the dry Central Valley and southern arid regions. In California, male home ranges averaged 1.5 ha (3.8 ac), and home ranges for females averaged 0.5 ha (1.3 ac). Home ranges often conform to the size and shape of cover patches. Homing ability extends up to 350 m (1150 ft) . Males apparently are not territorial; home ranges overlap. Females sometimes protect areas.

SCAT - Brush rabbit scat is round and usually in a pile. The round pellets are about 1/4" in diameter.

TRACK -

WHITE-TAILED JACKRABBIT - Lepus townsendii.

DESCRIPTION - The White-tailed Jackrabbit, Prairie Hare or White Jack as it is commonly referred to, is the largest hare , having a head and body length of 18 to 22 inches (46 to 56 cm), hind foot average 6 1/4" (15.9 cm), average ear length 4" (10.2 cm),and weighing 5 to 10 pounds (2.2 to 4.5 kg). It is brownish gray in summer and white or pale gray in winter The entire tail is white. They have long, antenna-like ears, long legs, and large body size in comparison to the snowshoe hare. It is relatively slim hare with very slender legs and a relatively long white tail.

There is little current information regarding population status in California, but evidence points to a serious decline. Overgrazing by livestock has been cited as a principal factor, as well as cultivation and other development. May now be absent from large portions of its previous range, as in Lassen Co. where the last records are 20 year old. California Species of Special Concern.

REPRODUCTION - The hare does not build nests for its young which are born fully furred with their eyes open. The rabbit does build nests and its young are born naked with their eyes closed. Members of the genus Lepus are born well-furred and able to move about. Little or no nest is prepared, although the young are kept hidden for 3 to 4 days. Females may produce up to 4 litters per year with 2 to 8 young per litter. Reproductive rates may vary from year to year depending on environmental conditions. The population is cyclical with major fluctuations about every seven years. During mating season the bucks fight with their hind feet.

Whitetail jackrabbit track diagramTRACKS -

SCAT - White-tailed jackrabbit scat is round and usually in a pile. The round pellets are about 3/8" in diameter.

DEFENSES - It has a good sense of smell and its eyes are set far back which aids in spotting its enemies quickly. It can run 30-35 mph (48-56 kph) for short distances with hops of 5'-20' (4.5- 6 m). It also can change directions very quickly eluding capture. The white-tailed jackrabbit is also a strong swimmer and may plunge into a river when pursued and swim buoyantly with much splashing to the other side. The hare lives in open habitat and runs to escape predators rather than hiding in the woods as the rabbit does.

RANGE - The white-tailed jackrabbit is found mainly in the north central and north-western United States and no further south than the extreme north central part of New Mexico and southern Kansas. Click for range map

DIET - Hares consume 1/2 to 1 pound (1.1 to 2.2 kg) of green vegetation each day. It eats grasses, weedy plants, shrubs, clover and in winter buds, twigs and dried vegetation.

 

BLACKTAIL JACKRABBIT - Lepus californicus

DESCRIPTION - Also know as the Jackass rabbit. Their color is grayish-brown with large black-tipped ears and black streak on top of tail. Found throughout the West in grasslands, open areas and sparsely vegetated deserts. Average weight. 4-7 lb (1.8-3.1 kg); Average length 17"-24" (43-61 cm); Hind foot average 5" (12.7 cm); Average ear length 4 1/4" (10.8 cm).

HABITAT - The habitat of the blacktail jackrabbit is barren or sparsely vegetated sagebrush areas and foothills of the mountains within its range.

REPRODUCTION - The hare does not build nests for its young which are born fully furred with their eyes open. The rabbit does build nests and its young are born naked with their eyes closed. Members of the genus Lepus are born well-furred and able to move about. Little or no nest is prepared, although the young are kept hidden for 3 to 4 days. Females may produce up to 4 litters per year with 2 to 8 young per litter. Reproductive rates may vary from year to year depending on environmental conditions. The population is cyclical with major fluctuations about every seven years. During mating season the bucks fight with their hind feet.

Blacktail jackrabbit track diagramTRACKS -

SCAT - White-tailed jackrabbit scat is round and usually in a pile. The round pellets are about 3/8" in diameter.

DEFENSES - It has a good sense of smell and its eyes are set far back which aids in spotting its enemies quickly. It can run 30-35 mph (48-56 kph) for short distances with hops of 5'-20' (4.5- 6 m). It also can change directions very quickly eluding capture. The blacktail jackrabbit is also a strong swimmer and may plunge into a river when pursued and swim buoyantly with much splashing to the other side. The hare lives in open habitat and runs to escape predators rather than hiding in the woods as the rabbit does.

RANGE - The blacktail jackrabbit is found mainly in the southwestern United States and the southern Great Plains, and no further north than central South Dakota and southern Washington. Click for range map

DIET - Hares consume 1/2 to 1 pound (1.1 to 2.2 kg) of green vegetation each day. It eats grasses, weedy plants, shrubs, clover and in winter buds, twigs and dried vegetation.

 

PYGMY RABBIT - Brachylagus idahoensis

DESCRIPTION - Pygmy rabbits are the smallest member of the genus Brachylagus, with length 11.5 inches on average. This species is found in sagebrush, bitterbrush, and pinyon-juniper habitats. Also know as the Pygmy cottontail rabbit. They are very shy and active only at night.

DIET - Big sagebrush is highly preferred, providing up to 99% of the diet in winter. Grasses provide up to 40% of the diet from mid-summer to fall; a variety of grasses and forbs is eaten . Bitterbrush is taken only rarely, even though it may be dense in the pygmy rabbit's habitat. Forages on the ground and in shrubs. May store food in burrow.

HABITAT - The pygmy rabbit may be the only rabbit to dig its own burrows. Burrows have several entrances (up to 10), and are located in slopes oriented in a north-to-east direction. Chambers may be 1 m (3.3 ft) deep. In dense brush, the pygmy rabbit may use forms during the day instead of burrows. During winter, it makes a network of subnivean trails at the bases of shrubs for cover and feeding.

REPRODUCTION - Mating occurs from late February to early May. After a 27- to 30-day gestation period, the young are born from March to early August. Litter size averages 6, and 3 litters per year have been reported in Idaho . The young are helpless, naked, and blind when born. Mortality is highest in late winter and early spring. It is assumed that burrows are the nesting sites, though no chambers of nesting materials have been found.

DEFENSES - Weasels are the principal predator, followed by coyotes, foxes, owls, and hawks. Pygmy rabbits have a very distinctive alarm call. It has been supposed that they have developed this call because they live in dense sage brush and as a result can't see their neighbors. Males tend to be more vocal than the females.

RANGE -The pygmy rabbit is found in the Great Basin habitats of Modoc, Lassen, and Mono counties of California. Pygmy rabbit has only recently been discovered in Wyoming. This has lead to speculation that their range is expanding. Click for range map

SCAT - Pygmy rabbit scat is round and usually in a pile. The round pellets are about 1/4" in diameter.

TRACKS -

SNOWSHOE HARE - Lepus americanus

DESCRIPTION - Two subspecies are found in California. Both are California Species of Special Concern. L. a. klamathensis is found in vicinity of Mt. Shasta, the Trinity Mts. and possibly the Warner Mts.; L. a tahoensis is found in the Sierra Nevada. Numbers of both subspecies, but particularly L. a. klamathensis are unknown, and may be quite low (especially in Warner Mts.). Also called snowshoe rabbit and varying hare.

DIET - Grazes and browses. Summer food primarily consists of grasses, forbs, sedges, and low shrubs. Needles and bark of conifers, and leaves and green twigs of willow and alder, are eaten in the winter.

HABITAT - Prefers edges, heterogeneous habitats, and areas with dense understory, particularly in riparian habitats. Also found in areas with young firs with branches drooping to ground, and in patches of ceanothus and manzanita within, or bordering, fir or pine forests. Rarely found in open spaces or mature closed canopy forests. Primarily found in montane riparian habitats with thickets of alders and willows, and in stands of young conifers interspersed with chaparral. The early seral stages of mixed conifer, subalpine conifer, red fir, Jeffrey pine, lodgepole pine, and aspen are likely habitats, primarily along edges, and especially near meadows. Dense cover is preferred, either in understory thickets of montane riparian habitats, or in shrubby understories of young conifer habitats. A shallow bowl-like depression (form) is made in dense understory or brush piles.

REPRODUCTION - Breeds mid-February to June or July. The gestation period is 35-37 days. Litter size varies from 1-7, with about around 3. Polyestrous, with 2-3 litters per year. Young breed in second year. It is likely that no definite nests are built, but grass, fur, or needles may line a shallow form placed under a shrub, log, or in slash. Males are generally intolerant of each other, particularly during breeding season, and fights are frequent.

DEFENSES - Bobcats are the main predators of snowshoe hares, followed by minks, weasels, foxes, coyotes, great horned owls, and domestic dogs and cats.

RANGE -An uncommon resident at upper elevations in the Cascade Mts. in Siskiyou and Del Norte counties south through the Sierra Nevada to Mariposa, Mono, and Madera cos. A small, insular population also has been reported in the Warner Mts., Modoc Co.

SCAT - Pygmy rabbit scat is round and usually in a pile. The round pellets are about 1/4" in diameter.

TRACKS -

REFERENCES FOR ABOVE INFO

Asdell, S. A. 1964. Patterns of mammalian reproduction. 2nd ed. Cornell Univ. Press, Ithaca, Ny. 670pp.
Conroy, M. J., L. W. Gysel, and G. R. Dudderar. 1979. Habitat components of clear-cut areas for snowshoe hares in Michigan. J. Wildl. Manage. 43:680-690.
Dolbeer, R. A., and W. R. Clark. 1975. Population ecology of snowshoe hares in the central Rocky Mountains. J. Wildl. Manage. 39:535-549.
Ingles, L. G. 1965. Mammals of the Pacific states. Stanford Univ. Press, Stanford, CA. 506pp.
O'Farrell, T. P. 1965. Home range and ecology of snowshoe hares in interior Alaska. J. Mammal. 46:406-418.
Orr, R. T. 1937. Systematics and natural history of Californian hares and rabbits (Family Leporidae). Ph.D. Thesis, Univ. California, Berkeley. 302pp.
Orr, R. T. 1940. The rabbits of California. Calif. Acad. Sci. Occas. Pap. No. 19. 227pp.
Pease, J. L., R. H. Vowles, and L. B. Keith. 1979. Interaction of snowshoe hares and woody vegetation. J. Wildl. Manage. 43:43-60.
Todd, A. W., L. B. Keith, and C. A. Fischer. 1981. Population ecology of coyotes during a fluctuation of snowshoe hares. J. Wildl. Manage. 45:629-640.
Williams, D. F. 1986. Mammalian species of special concern in California. Calif. Dept. Fish and Game, Sacramento. Admin. Rep. 86-1. 112pp.
Wolff, J. O. 1980. The role of habitat patchiness in the population dynamics of snowshoe hares. Ecol. Monogr. 50:111-130.


Rabbit Hunting Tips

The best time to hunt rabbits is early morning and at sunset, when they’re most active.

Rabbits are famous for speed, which is why they’re so much fun to hunt. Jackrabbits hide by “freezing” in cover, but once they’re jumped they head for open country. Cottontails run in a big circle after they’re jumped, so many hunters will use a dog to trail the rabbit while the hunter waits for it to return.

Look for rabbits in brushy, rocky areas where they can hide from predators. Brushy, stream side habitat is a favorite. If you are interested in creating brush piles or rock piles for rabbit habitat that will provide game for years to come, call Wildlife Biologist Dale Whitmore at (530) 743-5068 and ask for tips on where and how to make a wildlife brush pile.

Some Tips From Jim Matthews

Like with most other small and upland game, rabbits are creatures of their habitat, and good rain years generally translate into good rabbit years. Bad water years, like this one, seems to concentrate the rabbits in areas where the moisture and feed are best. Find the spots where the water and feed is good, and you'll find rabbits even in these dry years.

Scouting: That requires a little scouting. Since I often don't bother or have time to scout prior to the season, my scouting is usually done with a .22 in hand -- just in case. I mostly hunt Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management land. Two to five-year old foothill burns in canyons that have seasonal or permanent water are usually hot spots because they allow for lots of fresh vegetation and -- more importantly for us -- enough openings for visibility. In more arid areas of our deserts, hunting rabbits like big game makes sense: focus on the northeast-facing slopes where there is more vegetation and cover. I focus most of my scouting in chaparral and pinon-juniper habitats, and driving dirt roads after dark is a good way to find areas with concentrations of bunnies.

Binoculars: I learned a long time ago that you see more game by looking than walking. This is just as true with rabbits as big game, and I hunt with a binocular around my neck. Since most game is spotted at first or last light, I like binoculars that have an exit pupil of at least 4 mm (divide the power into the diameter of the object lens to determine exit pupil), which lets out most compacts for me. The greater exit pupil allows you to see better in low light, allowing you to peer into deep brushy shadows and see game at last shooting light.

Rifles and Ammo: One word here -- accurate. For more of my rabbit hunting, I use one of two rifles, an Anschutz Model 1516 in .22 magnum or a Ruger M77/22 in the regular .22 rimfire round. Both bolt rifles are accurate. I know that I can hit a rabbit in the head at 50 yards with either gun. In fact, I'm pretty confident with the .22 mag on out to 125-yard shots. I find most shots are from 20 to 40 yards, almost always on sitting game. There's not a lot of meat on the front quarters of a yearling rabbit, and if you are more comfortable with this bigger target, instead of the head, use the front quarters as your aiming point. Both shots will anchor a rabbit quickly and humanely. With the .22 mag, I generally use Winchester Supreme 34-grain load, Federal's Premium 30-grain load, or the new CCI 30-grain TNT load, while with the .22, I use Winchester Power Points or Remington Yellowjackets.

Most shotguns, archery and rifles (including air rifles firing pellets, excluding BB’s, powered by compressed air or gas) are legal for rabbit hunting. Pellet rifles became a legal weapon for taking rabbits just last year.


Rabbit Hunting Safety and Ethics

SAFETY

Rabbit hunting is a relatively safe sport. However, it is imperative that to remain a safe sport that certain safety rules be adhered to without exception. When you take a newcomer, especially children, into the hunting experience, part of your responsibility as a hunter is to teach that person proper safety. The following rules are good ones to LIVE by:

THE ELEVEN COMMANDMENTS OF RABBIT HUNTING SAFETY

1) Always treat the gun as loaded.
2) Never have a loaded gun except when hunting.
3) Always make sure that the barrel and action are clear of obstructions.
4) Always carry your gun so dig you can control the direction of the muzzle, even if you stumble.
5) Always keep the safety on until the gun is brought to shoulder.
6) Always make sure your target is a rabbit and your backstop is not a hunter or a dog.
7) Never point a gun at anything you do not want to shoot.
8) Never leave guns or ammunition within reach of children or careless adults.
9) Never climb trees or fences with a loaded gun.
10) Never shoot at a flat, hard surface or water.
11) Never drink alcohol or take other mood-altering drugs before or during a hunt.

Always know where all members of your hunting party are. The more members in your party the more difficult this will be. It is recommended to keep hunting parties as small as possible, preferably two, but no more than three. If you are with a large party, try to spread out or split into several groups of two.

If your party has found some rabbits, determine in which directions it would be unsafe to shoot. Each person should wear some safety orange, a little is better than none. Camouflage clothing is not necessary for rabbit hunting, they know where you are regardless of what you wear. Take extra precautions during deer season. Wear plenty of safety orange and talk with your buddy while hunting.

If you have to chase down a crippled rabbit, make sure your gun is on safety.' Almost all good rabbit country is good rattlesnake country. Be careful around brush and water. When hunting in the deserts of California, always be sure to carry plenty of water. If you are hunting with a dog, make sure to carry additional water for your dog. It also pays to avoid hunting during the mid-day hours when it can be quite hot. Be prepared for cold temperatures at night.

HUNTER ETHICS

Hunting in this state and country is not a right, but a privilege. In order to preserve this privilege, it is essential that each rabbit hunter, as a representative of all rabbit hunters, conduct him or herself in an ethical manner. Without the public's support even if this support is in the form of indifference, we could lose our cherished privilege. The following are some suggestions:

1) Respect other's property: don't trespass without permission; don't litter, leave gates as you find them; if driving on someone's property, drive slowly, and don't drive off the roads; don't harass livestock; and do offer to repair or compensate for damage you may have caused.

2) Be kind and courteous: don't interfere with other hunters, campers or bird watchers; and always be helpful - whether it be telling a landowner about a hole in his fence, or offering to help fix the fence.

3) Conduct oneself as a sportsman: always hunt safely! always follow the regulations - nobody likes a game hog and don't shoot birds of prey (this includes Cooper's hawks).


 

Rabbit Hunting Gear List

You'll need Acrobat Reader to read and print this .pdf file gear checklist, you can get Acrobat at

http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

Please click the link below for a gear checklist you can print out.

http://www.jesseshunting.com/hunting-gear-list.pdf


Rabbit Meat Care and Recipes

FIELD DRESSING AND CARE

Rabbits should be dressed (gutted) as -soon as possible. Hunters should consider wearing latex gloves when field dressing a rabbit. This safety measure will minimize their exposure to tularemia, a bacterial disease that is only rarely carried by rabbits. The disease is named after the place where it was discovered, Tulare, California. It is a good idea to dress them as soon as there is a lull in the action. The basic method goes as follows:

1) Hold or place the rabbit belly side up and with a knife make a cut that runs from the chest down to the anus through the skin. Make sure not to cut the guts.

2) With a small gutting hook or your finger reach up into the body cavity (toward the head) and gently pull out the guts. Pull or cut off the intestine and the vent.

3) Be sure to remove the lungs (the red-pink spongy stuff up in the body cavity). Also wipe or rinse out any blood. If you wash the body cavity out be sure to wipe it dry.

You are done with the field dressing. This allows the rabbit to cool as quickly as possible, and removes as many sources of bacteria as possible. Small numbers of these bacteria promote aging, but large numbers will spoil the bird quickly. It is always important to get the rabbits cooled down and kept cold as soon as possible. It is especially so during the early part of the season when it can be quite hot. So get the rabbits on ice quickly. It is also important not to let them get wet in the ice chest. Water promotes the contamination and growth of bacteria.

ALWAYS KEEP THE RABBITS AS CLEAN AS POSSIBLE - DIRT AND FLIES INCREASES CHANCES OF SPOILAGE.

DO NOT LEAVE RABBITS IN GAME BAG, TRUNK OR DIRECT SUNLIGHT.

When you get home, remove all internal organs that may still be in the rabbit. This includes the heart. kidneys, and the wind pipe. The next task is to skin the rabbit and cut off the legs and head.

STORAGE

If the rabbits are not going to be eaten within about a week, they should be frozen using one of the following methods:

1) Freeze them in water. For example: Place cleaned rabbit in a large carton. Fill with water to within 1/2 - inch of the top crease of the flat sides. Staple the top shut and label with  contents and date frozen. They will keep this way almost until next season.

2) Ziplock bags - place cleaned rabbits in bag and squeeze out the air and seal. Warning: if water gets onto the seal it may fail when freezing. This will result in freezer bum. You should check to see if the seal held.

3) Tightly double wrap the rabbbit in heavy butcher paper and label with date and contents.

If they are going to be consumed immediately or within a week the cleaned and dry rabbit should be placed in a scaled container in the refrigerator (plastic wrap or re-sealable plastic container).

AGING

You do not have to age rabbit to have a fine meal, but to get the most out of them and if you like flavorful, tender game, you should age it. It has been found through taste tests on game that well aged meat was always rated the highest for taste, texture and tenderness. The gamey taste and tenderness of meat is caused by the breakdown of muscle tissue by certain bacteria. These same bacteria will cause spoilage of the meat if they become to numerous. This is usually recognized by a strong off-odor. The French do not consider their game sufficiently aged until it is in a condition most of us would consider rotten. Another type of bacteria can cause food poisoning, but does not grow in cold places like your refrigerator. Therefore, so long as you age your quail in the refrigerator you don't have to worry very much about food poisoning.

Aging of upland game can be done nicely in your refrigerator. Place cleaned - dry rabbit in a sealed container into the refrigerator (plastic wrap or other airtight container). They can be left there up to about 7 days (at 47 degrees Fahrenheit or less). The longer you leave them, the more gamey the taste. Rabbits left over 7 days may become too ripe. How long it takes to get to your favorite level of gaminess depends upon several factors:

1) How warm it was in the field. In hot weather they can spoil in a day.

2) How quickly you cooled them down. The faster the better.

3) How well they were cleaned and how badly they were shot up - Poorly cleaned or badly shot-up rabbits will age very quickly. Whenever shot has passed through the gut and into the meat aging will occur much more quickly there. These rabbits should not be aged more than three or four days before eating.

4) The temperature at which they were aged. The higher above freezing, the faster they age.

The aging process begins as soon as you kill them. Therefore, rabbits bagged, cleaned, and placed in the refrigerator all on the same day will take longer to age, or keep in the refrigerator longer than one bagged Saturday, cleaned and put in the refrigerator on Sunday night. The best way to tell when the game has reached a desired level of aging is by smell. It will take some experimentation to familiarize yourself with the smell of meat that has aged to your liking.

Jim Matthews on Game Care

Try to clean and skin your rabbits within two hours after you shoot them. If you happen to shoot them in the guts, clean them quicker. Don't leave them in a game bag or truck bed half a day. I like to get them cleaned and in marinade within an hour and have them the next day, or that evening if it was a morning hunt. If you want to save up three or four rabbits for a bigger gathering, rabbits retain their wonderful flavor even after freezing. I would recommend a vacuum freezing system to eliminate freezer burn, or you can freeze rabbits in those hefty freezer bags filled with water so the rabbit is completely encased in ice. That helps eliminate the contact with air that causes freezer burn.

I like rabbits just about any way they are prepared -- in stews (with big shitake mushrooms, ummmmm), grilled, fried, or even baked. I probably barbecue them (after soaking in one of several simple marinades) more than any other method. They are better than chicken.


 

Maps of Legal Rabbit Hunting & Shooting Areas

FirearmsMaps.com - Being a hunter and living in California has its challenges. The biggest problem is knowing where you can legally discharge a firearm. Each county in California has its own firearms ordinance, so Netcomp creates its maps starting with the County Ordinance. There are also many other agencies involved such as Federal, State, County, City, BLM, Private, Fish and Game, OHV, Forestry, University, Indian and Preserves. The average hunter has no way of knowing which jurisdiction prevails. The collection of data we use tries to account for all these factors and agencies. With land ownership constantly changing, it requires us all to verify that one can discharge a firearm in that area before going hunting. JHO Sponsor.

San Bernardino County Shooting Map. The county revised their shooting in the summer of 2010 and the maps are online now. The printed version is available for sale at Bass Pro in Rancho Cucamonga. Other vendors will be carrying the maps in the future. Right now you can use a cellphone to pull up the online maps but the color coding is not working.

Some tips on printing the new San Bernardino County shooting map.

Zoom in to where you want your view of the map, usually 150% to 300% depending on how big an area you want and how much detail.

1. Click on "print", then on "Print Range" click on "Current View" and that will print the area you're looking at.

2. In the "Page Scaling" section choose, "Fit To Printable Area". That will enlarge the print to whatever size paper your printer is using.

3. Then in "Page Scaling" choose, "Fit to paper". That will enlarge the print to whatever size paper your printer is using.

4. Select "Advanced" and check "Print As Image". This will just print the screen image (what you see) and not all the layers you don't see or need.

Then print.

Mammoth Lakes No Shoot Area Map

Top of Document


Rabbit Hunting Publications

California Game And Fish .... CA hunting magazine.
California Sportsman ....Many of the writers from Fish & Hunting News are here.

California Upland Game Magazine .... 16 page full magazine published twice yearly covering quail, pheasant, wild turkeys, chukar, grouse, rabbits and squirrels. Call PH # 916-653-4263 to receive it in the mail, or pick it up at your nearest regional office.
California Game and Fish Magazine .... Excellent monthly magazine for $14.97 yearly. PH# 1-770-953-9222.
Fishing and Hunting News .... No longer around.
Western Outdoor News .... Fine weekly newspaper with maps and tons of timely reports. $36.95 for 52 issues. Ph# 1-714-546-4370. Call the 'Hunter's Hotline' to give your story for publishing. Ph # 1-714-546-4370 ext. 48 or fax: 1-714-662-3486 or e-mail: wonmail@aol.com.

Places to Hunt Rabbits

WILDLIFE AREAS OFFER MANY HUNTING OPPORTUNITIES

Most of the Department’s wildlife areas are open to rabbit hunting. There may, however, be restrictions to the method of take. For a complete listing of state and federal wildlife areas open to rabbit hunting, refer to the 2001/2002 California Regulations For Hunting and Other Public Uses On State and Federal Areas (the new booklet for 2002/2003 will be available in late September). For complete hunting regulations consult the 2002-2003 California Hunting Regulations, Mammals and Furbearers which is available at all Department of Fish and Game offices and license agents in June. Locations for hunting rabbits on state wildlife areas and other public lands w/ phone #’s for more info. Properties are generally listed from north to south. Phone #’s are for maps or more info.

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

Tehama WA (44,601 acres) - Tehama County -Type C area - 25 miles east of Red Bluff on Highway 36 to Plum Creek Road; or east on Hogsback Road. Cottontail in fair abundance. Best prospects near Plum Creek Road riparian area, High Trestle Road, and Finley Road. Jackrabbit abundant. Call DFG at (530) 597-2201.

Oroville WA (10,000 acres) - Butte County - Type C area - No rifles or pistols - West of Oroville on Highway 162. Hunting is allowed only from September 1 through January 31 and during spring turkey season, when only turkeys may be hunted. Spring turkey hunting is by permit only, there is no fall turkey hunting allowed. Call DFG at (530) 538- 2236.

Lake Oroville State Recreation Area - Butte County - Hunting daily from September 15 through January 31 and for wild turkeys only during the spring wild turkey season - (4,150 acres) - 7 miles east of Oroville via Hwy 162; boat access to much of the area. The majority of the Recreation Area lands consists of a narrow strip surrounding Oroville Lake extending a minimum of 300 feet from the high water line to one-half mile or more in some areas. Some U.S. Forest Service and BLM lands adjoin the Recreation Area. CA and mtn quail, wild turkey, band-tailed pigeon, rabbits, squirrels and pheasant are also available. No waterfowl or deer hunting allowed. Hunting on or from the water surface of Lake Oroville is prohibited. For a map contact the Lake Oroville State Recreation Area, 400 Glen Drive, Oroville, CA 95966 or call (530) 538-2200 or 538-2219.

Upper Butte Basin Wildlife Area - Butte County -Type A area - Rabbit hunting during pheasant hunt days only -No rifles or pistols -

Upper Butte Basin, Little Dry Creek WA, 11 miles west of Gridley on Gridley Colusa Hwy and turn right at the wildlife area entrance.

Upper Butte Basin, Howard Slough WA, 11 miles west of Highway 99 on Highway 162 and turn right on ZZ Road for 1 mile to the check station.

Upper Butte Basin, Llano Saco WA, 13 miles west of Hwy 99 and turn right on Z Road/7 Mile Road for 7 miles to the check station on the left. Entry for rabbit hunting on Sat., Sun., and Wed., is controlled by waterfowl permit regulations. Call (530) 982-2169 for more info.

Gray Lodge WA (9200 acres) - Butte County - Type A area - Rabbit hunting during pheasant hunt days only - No rifles or pistols -10 miles east of Live Oak on Pennington and Almond Orchard Roads, (530) 846-3315. Entry for rabbit hunting on Sat., Sun., and Wed., is controlled by waterfowl permit regulations. Dove hunting is daily during the September dove season and only on waterfowl or pheasant hunt days during the late dove season.

Daugherty Hill WA (4,200 acres) - Yuba County - Type C area - 21 miles east of Marysville via Hwy 20, Marysville Road and Dolan Harding Road, DFG Region 2 at (916) 358-2900. Open for hunting from July 1 through January 31 and spring turkey season. An entry permit, issued by special drawing, is required for the first 9 days of the spring turkey season.

Spenceville WA (11,213 acres) - Yuba County - Type C area - East of Marysville on Highway 20 about 18 miles and turn right on Smartville Road for 1 mile. Hunt the riparian areas along Dry Creek and Little Dry Creek. Hunting is allowed only from September 1 through January 31 and during spring turkey season, when only turkeys may be hunted. An entry permit, issued by special drawing, is required for the first 9 days of the spring turkey season. Call DFG at (530) 538-2236.

Sutter Bypass WA (3766 acres) - Sutter County - Type C area - No rifles or pistols - 10 miles west of Yuba City via Highway 20 or Franklin Road or Oswald Road or Highway 113. DFG, Region 2 (916) 358-2900.

Feather River Wildlife Area (2200 acres in 5 separate properties) Yuba and Sutter Counties - Type C areas - No rifles or pistols - 10-15 miles south of Yuba City and Marysville. Located between Sacramento and Marysville-Yuba City had an abundance of cottontail rabbits in 2001. The combination of no flooding since 1997, good habitat, and favorable spring weather for upland game species produced an abundance of rabbits. If the 2002 spring flooding is not severe, 2002 should be another very good year. Bring your shotgun (no rifles or pistols are allowed), be there at daylight, enjoy the sunrise and good hunting. Abbott Lake and the O’Connor Lakes Units are south of Yuba City on Garden Highway at the end of Star Bend Road. The Nelson Slough Unit is under the Highway 99 Bridge near Nicolaus. The Star Bend and Lake of the Woods Units are south of Marysville on Feather River Boulevard and accessible from the Star Bend Fishing Access. DFG, Region 2 (916) 358-2900. Hunt the heavy cover areas along the sloughs and levee ramps. Open for hunting from July 1 through January 31 and spring turkey season.

Auburn State Recreation Area (30,000 acres) - South of Interstate 80 near Auburn. Dept. of Parks and Recreation (530) 885-4527/988-0205. White Slough Wildlife Area (880 acres) - Type C area - Seven miles west of Lodi. No rifles or pistols. DFG, Region 2 (916) 358-2900. Hunting is allowed from September 1 through January 31.

New Hogan Lake - Hunting every day - 400 acres- 30 miles east of Stockton. Quail, mourning dove, waterfowl, and rabbits are also available. Shotguns and archery equipment only. Access via Hwy 12. Corps of Engineers (209) 772-1343.

New Melones Lake (500 acres) 25 miles east of Oakdale; Access via Hwy 108/120 to Hwy 49; CA quail, mourning dove and rabbits. Bureau of Reclamation (209) 536-9094.

Napa-Sonoma Marshes Wildlife Area - 14,000 acres - Type C area - No rifles or pistols. Located west and north of Highway 37 near the city of Vallejo, east and south of Highway 121 near the cities of Sonoma and Napa. The area is accessed by boat via Mud Slough, Napa Slough, Huichica Slough and other tributary sloughs. Hunt days are Sat., Sun., and Wed., during open seasons for waterfowl, coots, moorhen, snipe rabbits, pheasants, and doves, except that doves and rabbits may be hunted daily during the September dove season. Call DFG at 707 944-5500.

Grizzly Island Wildlife Area Overview Map Solano County - 10,000 acres - Type A area - Rabbit allowed daily in July and on pheasant hunt days. Self-registration during the July rabbit hunt. Cottontail numbers are good. Jackrabbits are abundant. Access is 14 miles south of Fairfield (Hwy 12) on Grizzly Island Road. Call DFG at (707) 425-3828.
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area Detail Map

Grizzly Island Wildlife Area - Goodyear Slough Unit
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area -Grey Goose Unit
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area - Island Slough Unit

Cache Creek Wildlife Area and BLM Area (3,860 acre of DFG land) and Cache Creek Management Area (85,000 acres of BLM land) in Lake, Yolo and Colusa Counties. Habitat: Oak grassland and dense chaparral. There are 3 access points. 1. North Fork Cache Creek Trailhead; from Interstate Highway 5 at Williams, go west on Highway 20 approximately 33 miles to the parking lot on the south side of the road. The entrance is immediately past where Highway 20 crosses over North Fork Cache Creek. From Highway 101 at Calpella, go east on Highway 20 about 48 miles to the parking lot. 2. Langs Peak Road Access; take Highway 16 south of Highway 20 to County Road 40. Follow the winding switchbacks for 4.5 miles to Langs Peak Road. Langs Peak road is a 4WD road. 3. Davis Street Access; take Highway 53 south off Highway 20 to 40th Avenue and turn left at the stop light. Make immediate left and follow to Davis Street. Access is to the left of the Clearlake landfill entrance. Deer, bear, wild pig, coyote, wild turkey, CA and mtn quail, mourning dove, tree squirrel, band-tailed pigeon, cottontail and jackrabbit are present. An entry permit for hunting, issued by special drawing by the DFG, is required for the first two days of the spring turkey season.

The Payne Ranch (13,000 acres) was recently purchased to improved habitat for wildlife and the tule elk herd. BLM Ukiah office at 707 468-4000 or DFG at (707) 944-5500

Indian Valley Wildlife Area (1,600 acres of DFG land) and Indian Valley Management Area (50,000 acres of BLM land) in Lake and Colusa Counties -Habitat: Dense chaparral with small scattered pockets of oak grassland. Access: About 27 miles west of Williams or 14 miles east of Clearlake Oaks on Highway 20 to Walker Ridge Road. Travel north on Walker Ridge Road to Indian Valley Reservoir. Deer, bear, wild pig, coyote, wild turkey, waterfowl, CA and mtn quail, dove, tree squirrel, cottontail and jackrabbit are present. The BLM has developed two campgrounds with water and restroom facilities. A boat ramp is available at the north and south ends of the lake. Warmwater fishing in the reservoir for largemouth bass, crappie, rainbow trout, bluegill and catfish. Cache Creek below the reservoir is planted with brown trout and is open during trout season. BLM in Ukiah at 707 468-4000.

Cow Mountain Recreation Area BLM (50,000 acres of BLM land) in Lake and Mendocino Counties. Habitat: Rugged chaparral with some oak woodland. Access from Ukiah, 5 miles via Talmage and Mill Creek roads. Access from Lakeport, 5 miles via Scott Creek Road which is a rugged unimproved dirt road, and is closed during the winter due to impassable high water. Because these roads are narrow and winding with steep slopes, large recreational vehicles and travel trailers are not recommended. The rifle range, located just north of the Willow Creek Day Use Site, has been developed specifically for target shooting. There are 5 camping areas. The 27,000 acre North Cow Mountain RA is closed to Off-Highway Vehicles. The 23,000 acre South Cow Mountain Off-Highway Vehicle RA has developed roads for OHV recreation. Open to hunting all year during legal seasons. Deer, bear, wild pig, coyote, wild turkey, CA quail, dove, tree squirrel, band-tailed pigeon, cottontail and jackrabbit are present. Bureau of Land Mgt in Ukiah (707) 468-4000.

Knoxville Recreation Area in Lake and Napa Counties; (18,000 acres of BLM land) in Lake and Napa Counties. Habitat: Chaparral and cypress. About 2/3 of the area burned in 1999. Access: From Lower Lake take Morgan Valley Road 13 miles to the north entrance. The north entrance is 1 mile past the main gate to the McLaughlin Mine. The south entrance is three miles further south at the intersection with Devilshead Road. The south entrance is 17 miles from Lake Berryessa. A target shooting area is located near the northern entrance. There are developed roads for Off-Highway Vehicles. Camping is permitted in undeveloped locations throughout the recreation area. Hunting Creek Camp is located at the intersection of Dunnigan Hill Road and Hunting Creek Road at Hunting Creek. It has 5 sites with shade structures, tables, restrooms and water. All roads and trails are open to motorized vehicles. Deer, wild pig, coyote, CA and mtn quail, dove, squirrel, and rabbit are present.

Bureau of Land Mgt in Ukiah 707 468-4000. Cedar Roughs Area (About 6,500 acres of BLM and DFG land in 2 blocks in Napa County). Habitat: Predominantly chaparral and cypress with some oak grassland. Deer, wild pig, coyote, wild turkey, valley and mtn quail, mourning dove, tree squirrel, cottontail and jackrabbit are present. Camping allowed but there are no campsites. BLM Ukiah office at 707 468-4000. Cedar Roughs main access: Located off Pope Canyon Rd. 2.2 miles west of Pope Creek Bridge, Lake Berryessa or 6.3 miles east of the Pope Valley airstrip. Provides access to about 6500 acres of land. Park on south side of brown and yellow gate and follow Pope Creek upstream approx. 1/4 mile. Look for trail markers. Cross Pope creek and climb hill a short distance to an abandoned jeep trail. Jeep trail provides access into the main block of public land. Note: The location where abandoned jeep trail crosses Pope Creek is private land.

Sheldon Creek Recreation Area ( 1000 acres of BLM land) in Mendocino County. Habitat: rugged chaparral. Access from Hopland, 10 miles east of Hopland via the Younce Road (Old Toll Road)(narrow, winding road).Open to hunting all year during legal seasons. Deer, bear, wild pig, coyote, CA quail, dove, tree squirrel, band-tailed pigeon, cottontail and jackrabbit are present. Campground with water. Bureau of Land Mgt in Ukiah 707 468-4000.

Boggs Mountain State Forest on Hwy 29 near Hobergs; 3,393 acres of mixed coniferous forest. Open to hunting all year during legal seasons. Deer, bear,wild pig, CA and mtn. quail, wild turkey, tree squirrel, cottontail and jackrabbit, and band-tailed pigeon are present. Access: From State Highway 29 at Middletown take Highway 175 north about 9 miles to the state forest entrance. Improved campsites with no water are available at 2 campgrounds. Boggs Mtn State Forest, PO Box 839, Cobb, CA 95426. 707 928-4378.

Mendocino National Forest in Glenn/Colusa/Mendocino/Lake Counties; Deer, bear, wild pig, coyote, wild turkey, CA and mtn quail, band-tailed pigeon, tree squirrel, cottontail rabbit and mourning dove are present; For a map contact Mendocino NF, 420 East Laurel Street, Willows, CA 95988 (530) 934-3316. Maps are $4-5.

 

CENTRAL COAST

General Overview Maps Of Region 3 Wildlife Areas.

Big Sandy Wildlife Area - Monterey and San Luis Obispo Cos.
Boggs Mountain State Forest - Lake Co.
Cache Creek Wildlife Area and BLM Area - Colusa and Lake Cos.
Cedar Roughs WA - Napa Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Camp Roberts
Fort Hunter Liggett
Cow Mountain Recreation Area BLM - Lake and Mendocino Cos.
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area Overview Map - Solano Co.
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area - Joice Island Unit - Solano Co.
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area Detail Map - Solano Co.
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area - Goodyear Slough Unit- Solano Co.
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area -Grey Goose Unit - Solano Co.
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area - Island Slough Unit - Solano Co.
Grizzly Island Wildlife Area - Waterfowl Season Map - Solano Co.
Hill Slough WA - SolanoCo. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Indian Valley Wildlife Area - Lake Co.
Jackson State Forest - Mendocino Co.
Knoxville WA - Napa Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Laguna WA - Sonoma Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Laguna Mountain BLM - San Benito Co.
Lake Berryessa WA - Napa Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Lake Mendocino - Mendocino Co.
Lake Sonoma Wildlife Area - Sonoma Co.
Morro Bay WA - San Luis Obispo Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Moss Landing WA - Monterey Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Napa-Sonoma Marshes WA - Napa Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Petaluma Marsh WA - Sonoma Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Point Edith WA - Contra Costa Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Rector Reservoir WA - Napa Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Red Mountain Area BLM - Mendocino Co.
San Francisco Bay Refuge -
San Luis Obispo WA - San Luis Obispo Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
San Pablo Bay WA - Marin Co. If anyone has this map, please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster emailso we can add it to the list.
Stockdale Mountain BLM - Monterey Co. E-mail from Joe about Stockdale Mountain. I was out at Stockdale Mt. getting info. What I found out from residents up there was scary. The only access is a narrow point off of Slack Canyon. Rd. The boundaries are not marked clearly! Mr. Kester owns all land around the area and patrols it often and Fish and Game also roams through daily. I was told by one of the outfitters on your page (one I trust and have a personal relationship with) up there that this area is pretty much a trap for hunters. I was told that going up there is just cause for trouble. There are no friendly warnings, no matter what game is being pursued. I hear that many hunters are sighted for poaching even when they are not meaning to do so. I suggest that you post a warning on your site for ALL TO BEWARE! and to know their location at all times. This area does have lots of hogs, but the terrain is thick with brush and hunters get in trouble when they look for a clearing (Kester's land). I suggest using a topo map with GPS in this area, and talking to DFG for boundaries. By the way, Kester is an outfitter and guide. Thanx Joe.

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY

O'Neill Forebay WA, Merced County - 700 acres - Type C area - No rifles or pistols; 12 miles NW of Los Banos on Highway south of Santa Nella and adjacent to O’Neill Forebay. Free permits at self-registration booth. Open for upland game hunting in season. An area that is known as home of the Junior Pheasant Hunts also has many other public use opportunities. Spring birding for small passerine birds is excellent. Several field trials will be held on the area during February and March and dog training is allowed. Call DFG at (209) 826-0463.

San Luis Reservoir Wildlife Area, Merced County - 800 acres - Type C area - Located at the top of Pacheco Pass on Dinosaur Point Road is an area that overlooks San Luis Reservoir. Free permits at self-registration booth. It is a beautiful spot to have a picnic, take a nature walk, and enjoy the wild flowers. Oaks, chemise and holly-leaf cherry abound on the area. Shotgun or bow and arrows only for game in season. Pig hunting is also available throughout the year. It should be noted that the number of pigs taken on the area in the past has been low. Call DFG at (209) 826-0463.

North Grasslands Wildlife Area, Merced and Stanislaus counties - 6,335 acres total - Type A area. Total of three units:

North Grasslands WA Gadwall Unit (south of Hwy 152, east of Los Banos),

North Grasslands WA Salt Slough Unit (six miles northeast of Los Banos),

North Grasslands WA China Island Unit (northeast of Gustine).

Foot access only. No rifles or pistols. Rabbit hunting is allowed daily from July 1 through September 15. Dove hunting in season. No fee, self-registration during non-waterfowl season. Hunt days for waterfowl, coots, moorhens, and snipe are Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays during open seasons. Pheasant hunt days are every day during the first nine days of the pheasant season and on Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays during the remainder of the pheasant season and on the day following Thanksgiving. Call DFG at (209) 826-0463.

Los Banos WA, Merced County - 6,000 acres - Type A area. Vehicles permitted on designated roads from end of waterfowl season through September 15. No rifles or pistols. Rabbit hunting is allowed daily from July 1 through September 15. Dove hunting in season. No fee, self-registration during non-waterfowl season . Hunt days for waterfowl, coots, moorhens, and snipe are Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays during open seasons. Pheasant hunt days are every day during the first nine days of the pheasant season and on Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays during the remainder of the pheasant season and on the day following Thanksgiving. Call DFG at (209) 826-0463.

Volta WA, Merced County - 3,000 acres - Type A area. Rabbit hunting is allowed daily from July 1 through September 15. Dove hunting in season. No fee, self-registration during non-waterfowl season. Hunt days for waterfowl, coots, moorhens, and snipe are Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays during open seasons. Pheasant hunt days are every day during the first nine days of the pheasant season and on Saturdays, Sundays, and Wednesdays during the remainder of the pheasant season and on the day following Thanksgiving. Call DFG at (209) 826-0463.

Cottonwood Creek Wildlife Area , Merced and Santa Clara counties - 6,316 acres - Type C area. Free permits at self-registration booths. Divided into two units.

Upper Cottonwood Creek Wildlife Area: This hilly,4000 acre wildlife area in western Merced County, just off Highway 152, is closed to all hunting and shooting sports until the Zone A deer season opens. Wild pig hunting opportunities on Upper Cottonwood Creek Wildlife Area opens with the Zone A deer season with the either bow and arrow or rifle, depending on the season. From the opening of the Zone A deer archery season through the last Sunday in January, wild pig may be taken with archery equipment. However, the opening weekend of general (rifle) season is restricted to persons holding a permit issued through a drawing to be held mid-July. For persons who desire to hunt wild pig with rifle or pistol legal for the taking of big game the remainder of the season, the area is open from the Monday after the opening of the general Zone A deer season through the last Sunday in January. Upland game hunting allowed during the time period when the area is open for weapons.

Lower Cottonwood Creek Wildlife Area: While not as steep as Upper Cottonwood Creek WA, this 2,000 acre area offers easier hiking and access. No hunting or shooting sports are allowed until Zone A deer season opens. On Lower Cottonwood Creek Wildlife Area, wild pig hunting opportunities will be the same as on Upper Cottonwood Creek Wildlife Area with two exceptions: 1) only shotgun with slugs, 12gauge or smaller, or bow and arrow may be used and 2) there is no drawing restriction for opening weekend of the general Zone A deer season. No rifles or pistols are allowed on the Lower Cottonwood Creek WildlifeArea. Upland game hunting allowed during the time period when the area is open for weapons. Call DFG at (209) 826-0463.

West Hilmar Wildlife Area - Merced County, 340 acres: Access to this 340 acre area is by boat only so there won’t be a lot of other people visiting the area when you are there. There are lots of oak and cottonwood trees on the area and it is an excellent place to visit for a quiet picnic. Shotgun or bow and arrows only for game in season. Call DFG at (209) 826-0463.

Little Panoche Reservoir Wildlife Area - Fresno County - 828 acres -Type C area. Free permits at selfregistration booth. Spring is the time for fishing in the reservoir located about seven miles west of Interstate 5 on Little Panoche Road. While the trail down to the water is steep, black bass, crappie and sun fish make the hike worth while. Dog trials and training are also very popular in February and March. Pig hunting is allowed throughout the year without dogs. Method of take is restricted to shotgun with slugs, 12 gauge or smaller, or bow and arrow. It should be noted that the number of pigs taken on the area in the past has been low. Call DFG at (209) 826-0463.

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

 

Cibola National Willife Refuge is just south of Blythe, hunters are reminded that non-toxic shot must be used for rabbit hunting on the federal refuge. For information, call Mike Hawkes, Manager, Route 2, Box 138 Cibola, AZ, 85328 Phone: 520/857-3253 Fax: 520/387-3420, email r2rw_ci@fws.gov

Click here for map of Cibola NWR,

Parker Arizona. The Colorado River Indian Tribes, (CRIT), own the 330,000 acres of property between Parker, Arizona to just north of Interstate 10 near Blythe. No state license is required, but hunters must have a seasonal permit from CRIT, which is $45. The permit allows hunters to hunt quail, ducks, and small game in season. CRIT hunting permits are available at Woody's Gas and Snack Parker, AZ (520) 669-8792 1001 Fiesta Ave. Woody's II Poston, AZ (520) 662-4801 Mohave Rd. June's Unique Parker, AZ (520) 669-8883 813 Kofa Ave. Hidden Valley Resort Blythe, CA (760) 922-6745 100 Colorado River Rd. Lost Lake Resort Lost Lake, CA (760) 664-4413 U.S. Highway 95. Mc's Market Parker Dam, AZ (520) 667-2231 58565 Riverside Dr. River Lagoon Resort. 50078 Parker Poston Rd. Ehrenberg, AZ (520) 923-7942. Yellow Mart Blythe, CA (760) 922-4215 228 Hobson Way Water Wheel Resort Blythe, CA (760) 922-3863 29900 Hwy. 95. CRIT Fish & Game Office Parker, AZ (520) 669-9285 2100 Mutahar.
Fort Mojave Indian Reservation. Above the Colorado River Indian Tribes is the Fort Mojave Indian Reservation, extending from Needles north to the Arizona-Nevada border. This reservation has land on both sides of the river and you can obtain a hunting permit to hunt there. PH# 520-330-3000. Click here for weather report at Parker Dam
Lake Perris State Recreation Area. This can be a pretty good place to shoot. Day use fee for access. Be aware that the season for doves and upland game here is from 1st Saturday following Labor Day, through January 31st.
San Bernardino National Forest (San Bernardino County) 1824 South Commercenter Circle San Bernardino, CA 92408-3430 1-909-383-5588. If you want to shoot some rabbits in a little cooler weather, head up to the mountains. Northeast of Lake Arrowhead, in the Bacon Flats, Rouse Meadows area there are a decent number of rabbits. It might take you all day to get a limit, but it's 15 to 20 degrees cooler than the valleys. Another spot to check is near Lost Lake, just west of I-215 near the town of Devore.
San Jacinto WA -Upland Map - Riverside Co.
Sonny Bono - Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge - Imperial Co.
Wister unit of Imperial WA - Imperial Co.


 

Rabbit Hunting Links

Ammo

Active Ammo .... is no longer in business. Kent Cartridges bought the company in 1997 and Kent does not make the nickel plated shells anymore, sorry.
Alliant Powder (formerly Hercules) .... check out the online reloading data.
Cheaper Than Dirt .... Shooting supplies and hunting gear.
Dillon Precision Products .... One of the best reloading companies.
Federal Ammo ....
Graf and Sons Inc. .... The reloading authority.
HEVI-SHOT™
.... Revolutionary, non-toxic lead shot alternative. With HEVI-SHOT™ shells, you can shoot a smaller shot size with more lethality. More pellets at a higher energy means more knock-down power. This new shotshell pellet is actually heavier than lead with the hardness similar to standard steel shot. It is made from a tungsten alloy and the hardness and density allow hunters to use smaller shot sizes to get equivalent energy as in larger lead or steel pellets. Because the pellet is smaller, this allows for more pellet to be in a shotshell cartridge which makes for a denser pattern, increasing the likelihood of multiple hits on the target. Both penetration and retained velocity are also greater with these pellets. Darryl Amick, who holds the patent on the tungsten-nickel alloy used to make this new shot, said he set out to offer something heavier than lead that would be even more effective for hunters. "My passion for this product is that I hate the fact that we wound these birds, that we have to shoot steel. I'm also absolutely committed to making this product as inexpensive as possible, and we'd like to be significantly under the other non-toxic alternatives to steel," said Amick. "It's going to perform better. I don't think anyone can argue that. It's just a matter of keeping costs down so guys can afford it," said Amick. You will be hearing more about Hevi-Shot in the near future as it becomes available for both reloaders and in loaded offerings.
Hodgdon Powder Company .... Reloading powder.
Hornady .... Bullets and reloading equipment.
Kent Cartridge ..... IMPACT™ shot shells are specifically designed to deliver the pattern density and down range lethality required by dedicated turkey hunters. These loads may be used in any Nitro-proofed shotgun without fear of barrel or choke damage. Standard choke restrictions and lead shot size recommendations apply, including X-full Turkey.
Lapua .... Makers of match grade ammo and Vihtavuori powders.
Lee Precision Inc. .... The Lee family has been providing affordable reloading products since 1958.

MEC .... Reloading equipment.
Midsouth Shooters Supply Co. .... Your complete source for shooting accessories and supplies.
Midway USA .... The world's largest mail order shooting and reloading superstore.
Powder Valley .... Offering the finest in reloading components at the best possible price.
Precision Reloading Inc. .... Unique and hard to find reloading products.
RCBS .... If you're into reloading, bookmark this page now. All the info you need to be a top-notch re-loader is right here:
Redding Reloading Equipment ....
Remington .... Guns and ammo.
Western Powders .... Western Powders is the largest Master Distributor of reloading powders in North America. We carry a full line of smokeless and black powders, and have also released our own line of high-performance, smokeless powders called RAMSHOT.
Widener's .... Here you will find great deals on all your hunting needs. From Ammunition to Powder. Featuring all the top name products such as Hornady, Nosler, Remington, RCBS, REDDING, SPEER, Winchester and much more.
Winchester Ammo .... Makers of great ammo.

Chokes

Ballistic Specialties .... Angle Porting chokes.
Briley Chokes ....
Carlson's ....
Gun Docc
.... Custom turkey gun work.
Hastings Chokes .... PH# 913-632-3169
Johnny's Shotgun Chokes and Forcing Cones
....
Kick's .... They make the famous "Gobblin' Thunder" choke
Patternmaster ....
Seminole Gunworks
.... Seminole specializes in the making of precision choke tubes for most makes and model of shotguns.
Trulock Chokes .... Manufacturers of superior shotgun chokes.

Dogs

Bryce Mann's Gundogs & Guide Service .... Gundog training near Visalia CA.
Foothill Brittanys .... Very Birdy, Natural Pointers and Retrievers (Land and Water).
Fresno Dog Training .... Realistic training and behavior solutions for dogs and their owners.
Gameland Kennels Dog Training Center ....Gameland Kennels is no longer in business.  Sadly, Patrick Callaghan passed away on September 29, 2009.  His wife, Shirley, tried to keep the business afloat, but suffered several small strokes in the months following Patrick's death.  In early January 2010, Shirley suffered a significant stroke from which she is currently recovering.
Grouse Mountain Brittanys .... John & Debbe Coyle. Redding, California. PH# 530-242-5801.
Gun Dog Supply .... Lots of gear for the upland hunter.
High Desert Brittanies .... We breed hunting dogs of the highest quality with great temperament, good looks and bird desire and provide wonderful family members to approved homes.
High Desert Kennels .... Bird dog training for 30 years. Family owned and run. Jimmy Berneathy Owner/Trainer.
High Test Retrievers. .... 1021 Lower Honcut Road, Oroville, California 95966
Hunting Dog Trainer .... Carl Porter. We are the complete hunting and field trial dog training program. We are located in the beautiful Southern California High Desert community of Lucerne Valley California. Our training grounds include our own 20 acres of real "Wild Bird" high desert habitat with quail and chukar available year round and pheasants upon request with thousands of unfenced wild acres surrounding our facility.
Lowell's Gundogs .... Gun dog training in the high desert near Victorville CA.
Reibar Kennels .... Grady Istre's excellence in dog training. 7480 Domingos Rd. Lompoc Ca. 93436, PH# 1-805-736-5309, e-mail reibar@impulse.net
Scott's Dog Supply .... Quail calls and dog gear.
Starlight Kennels .... Paul Cacciatori. We understand that hunting is more than a hobby, and that your dog is more than an animal. It's a lifestyle for which we share our clients' passion. That's why we devote so much to providing a complete array of hunting dog services so you can rely on Starlight as the single source for all your hunting dog needs.
UplandBirdDog.com .... Bill West. Information for bird dog and hunting enthusiasts.

If you know of any other trainers, dog links or info please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster email and we will update the listing.

Gear

2nd Amendment Sports .... Stores in Bakersfield CA. and Tucson AZ.
Bass Pro Shop .... One of the biggest hunting and fishing gear suppliers. Stop by one of their 'Outdoor World' stores, you'll be amazed. They have calls, decoys, shells, sights, blinds camo and tons more.
Badger John's Huntin' Stuff .... 5400 Date Ave. , Sacramento CA. PH# 916-489-1022.
Bass Pro Shop .... One of the biggest hunting and fishing gear suppliers. Stop by one of their 'Outdoor World' stores, you'll be amazed. They have calls, decoys, shells, sights, blinds camo and tons more.
B&B Bait .... 10380 8th Ave. Blythe Ca. 92225. Between 7th and Lovekin. PH# 760-921-2248.
Brigade Quartermasters .... Outdoor gear, military issue gear, GPS, everything you need.
Cabela's .... One of the biggest retailers of outdoor and hunting gear. They have calls, decoys, shells, sights, blinds camo and tons more.
E.A.R. Hearing Protection and Hearing Aids .... Protect your precious hearing with these fine quality ear plugs.
Field Time Sports & Guns .... 14542 Beach Blvd. Suite A, Westminster, CA  92683. Ph  714-891-3131.

Being a hunter and living in California has its challenges. The biggest problem is knowing where you can legally discharge a firearm. Each county in California has its own firearms ordinance, so Netcomp creates its maps starting with the County Ordinance. There are also many other agencies involved such as Federal, State, County, City, BLM, Private, Fish and Game, OHV, Forestry, University, Indian and Preserves. The average hunter has no way of knowing which jurisdiction prevails. The collection of data we use tries to account for all these factors and agencies. With land ownership constantly changing, it requires us all to verify that one can discharge a firearm in that area before going hunting. JHO Sponsor.
Lacrosse .... Excellent boots and waders.
Mack's Prairie Wings ....
Midwest Turkey Call Supply .... Everything you need for turkey and quail hunting.
Ranger Joe's .... Military, Law enforcement and outdoor gear.
REI ....The biggest outdoor store on the net.
Schnee's Boot's ....These guys make the best cold weather elk boots I've ever owned. I like the 'air bob' soles.
Schumachers Waterfowl Supply .... 1122 W. Struck Ave., Orange, Ca. 92867. PH# 714-288-0465.
Shomer-tec .... Law enforcement and military equipment. Box 28070, Bellingham, WA. 98228 ph# 360-733-6214. Call for free catalog.
Sprague's .... 345 W. 32nd Street, Yuma, Arizona, phone # 800-440-3892.
Turner's Outdoorsman .... Southern California's best hunting and fishing store.
Uncle Lee's Wing Supply .... PH# 1-800-388-9464 for your free catalog. They have GPS, clothing, and turkey and duck hunting equipment.
U.S. Cavalry .... World's finest military and adventure equipment.
Yellow Mart .... 82740 Miles Ave., Indio, CA 92201 Ph# 760-347-1107
Yellow Mart .... 228 W Hobsonway, Blythe, CA 92225. PH# 760-922-4215.

Guides

If you know of any rabbit hunting guides please e-mail us at Jesse's Hunting & Outdoors webmaster email and we will update the listing.

Guns

Beretta ....
Brownells .... Everything you need for your guns.
Browning ....
E.A.R. Hearing Protection and Hearing Aids .... Protect your precious hearing with these fine quality ear plugs. JHO sponsor.
Ithaca ....
Knight Muzzleloaders ....
Mossberg .... Shotguns and rifles.
Remington ....
Ruger ....
Weatherby ....
Winchester ....